The Nats disappoint–But it sure was great to be watching Major League Baseball

The Nats disappoint–But it sure was great to be watching Major League Baseball

David Boehm, Staff Writer

To say that the Washington Nationals underperformed this year would be an understatement. The defending world series champs never found their rhythm and the only thing that they managed to do right this season was alienate their massive fanbase.
 “It was tough watching the Nationals this year, especially toward the end,” said freshman Alex Mathews. “As a diehard fan, I felt let down with their poor placement and record.”
As the Nationals franchise looks to rebuild, we are reminded that a longer drought and more hardships could be on the horizon. Last year, we finished with 25 more wins than losses (93-69). Compared to this year’s 24-36 record, last season seems like a distant memory. Though there was certainly less time to turn things around, there are other factors that suggest that the District’s ball club is in trouble. Our minor league system has no dominant or show-stopping players in the works and our bullpen was ranked 23rd in the MLB out of 30 teams. In fact, this season’s bullpen had a record of 9-9 and was never above the .500 mark. They allowed opponents to hit for an average of .295 and only saved 12 games out of their 24 wins. Considering that the Nationals’ bullpen has always been an obstacle in the past, another season with a dismal showing is not a good sign for this recuperating team.
Although 2020 has been heartbreaking and tumultuous, Major League Baseball has brought about a sense of normalcy that we were sorely lacking. “Baseball has taken my mind off of all of the terrible things going on in the world and has allowed me to feel at least to some degree, a sense of togetherness and comradery brought by baseball along with the greater sports community,” said freshman William Decamp.
Although the Nationals have struggled this season, the league has seen some very entertaining play.
“You know with the shortened season there’s been a lot of really interesting things that have happened, whether that be players stepping up and finding themselves and their motivation without fans cheering them on, or covid outbreaks that plagued a few teams at the beginning of the season, most notably the Marlins and Cardinals. Along with all of this, what has really stood out to me is the number of young players who have stepped up and led their teams through this trying time like Bo Bichette and Fernando Tatis Jr.,” senior Cory McLucas said.
While young players seemed to dominate the sport this season, this year’s world series matchup had a mixture of experienced veterans such as Clayton Kershaw of the Dodgers and young players looking to make their mark on the sport such as Randy Arozarena of the Rays. Lasting only six games, the Fall Classic was won by the Los Angeles Dodgers who brought the title back to Los Angeles after a 36-year drought.
Having made it to the series three out of the last four years, this year was a year of reckoning for the Dodgers. The World Series MVP, Corey Seager, propelled his team throughout the playoffs with an incredible hitting performance. He hit 8 home runs, had 20 RBIs (one short of the all-time postseason record) and hit for an average of .328 during this postseason. Corey Seager was the player that Los Angeles needed to finally claim the world championship.